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05.25.17
Sixth Grade’s Beautiful Clay Work 5/26/17

Sixth Grade students created clay fish that were fantastic! They first selected a fish and drew it on paper to make a template. The template was then placed on the clay slab that had been rolled out to ¼”. Students used the outline of the fish to cut around with a clay tool. Excess clay was cut away. Any markings on the fish were imprinted into the clay by pressing down on the template. After removing the template, lines and markings were drawn into the clay by using a tool. The fish had to have a stand made of clay to attach the fish to. When finished, the fresh clay had to dry for a week to ten days. Students learned that if some water remained in the clay piece it could possibly explode in the kiln!

After firing the fish at 1900 degrees for about 13 hours. Then another half day went by as the kiln cooled off. Students then were able to paint their fish with glaze. The tricky part was that the colors of the glaze was not what their fish would look like when fired in the kiln again. Their fish turned out to be beautiful, as you can see by the photos of them!

Sixth Grade’s Beautiful Clay Work  5/26/17 image

Sixth Grade’s Beautiful Clay Work  5/26/17 image

Sixth Grade’s Beautiful Clay Work  5/26/17 image

Sixth Grade’s Beautiful Clay Work  5/26/17 image

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05.12.17
Fifth Grade’s Clay Flowers 5/12/17

Fifth graders made clay flower bowls this year. They selected a flower that they liked, and drew it on paper to use for a template. Some chose to make up their own version of a flower. Students placed the template on top of the rolled out clay and cut around the template. Students removed the paper template and lightly incised lines and markings of the flower pattern into the clay. After letting the flower dry for a couple of weeks, it was
fired in the kiln at 1900 degrees for 10 hours. After cooling for about 8 hours, the flower bowls were removed and painted with glaze. The glazed flower bowls were fired again for about ten hours. There are always lots of ooohs and ahhhhs when the students see the beautiful colors that emerge! Wonderful job, Fifth Graders!

Fifth Grade’s Clay Flowers 5/12/17 image

Fifth Grade’s Clay Flowers 5/12/17 image

Fifth Grade’s Clay Flowers 5/12/17 image

Fifth Grade’s Clay Flowers 5/12/17 image

Fifth Grade’s Clay Flowers 5/12/17 image

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04.28.17
St. James Art Students Win DAR at State, Region, and National

The Lone Star Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution (Lone Star DAR) proudly announced their 2016-2017 award winners for the Junior American Citizen (JAC) Contest. Lone Star DAR, awarded certificates to students placing at the state, regional and national levels. We congratulate our JAC Winners in the Stamp Design Contest “Our National Parks”:

Jack Sadowski – 1st Grade, St. James Day School
Stamp Design Contest – 1st Place, State of Texas

Adam Orr – 2nd Grade, St. James Day School
Stamp Design Contest – 1st Place, State of Texas

*Heath Wood – 3rd Grade, St. James Day School
Stamp Design Contest – 1st Place, State of Texas
1st Place, *South Central Division
Honorable Mention – National

*In order to win on a national level, the participants must win first place in state, then progress to the *South Central Division, which includes the states of Arkansas, Texas, Oklahoma, Missouri, Louisiana and Mississippi. They compete with all the first place winners of this division. The winner of the division then goes to national competition. There were more than 37,000 students from the U.S. who competed in this competition.

I am so proud of these boys, as well as all of my art students that worked so hard on this project. There were so many wonderful entries from St. James that I’m glad I did not have to judge them! Outstanding work!

Lone Star DAR has promoted the missions of education, conservation, preservation and patriotism in Texarkana community for more than 105 years. We thank Lone Star DAR Vice Regent Marji Fuerst for including us in the invitation to enter!
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St. James Art Students Win DAR at State, Region, and National image

St. James Art Students Win DAR at State, Region, and National image

St. James Art Students Win DAR at State, Region, and National image

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04.07.17
Artists Are In Their Right Mind!


Fifth grade students took on the interesting task of drawing Leonardo Da Vinci's famous painting, Mona Lisa, ..........upside down! This makes it difficult for the left side of the brain to interfere with the right side's ability to process information. They were able to "think like an artist". After drawing their Mona, many chose to complete it in the style of dadaist Duchamp, pop artist Warhol, or cubist Picasso. However, many of them chose to leave their Mona Lisa in the manner of Leonardo Da Vinci's realism. They decided, "Why mess with perfection?"

Kudos to our wonderful young artists for excellent work! This is always an art project that they will never forget.

Artists Are In Their Right Mind! image

Artists Are In Their Right Mind! image

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03.24.17
Mondrian Animals by 4th Graders:



After discussing Dutch artist Piet Mondrian and his works, fourth grade students took on the task of creating contour line animals, realistic and imaginary! The original animals were filled with vertical and horizontal lines which had to be kept parallel. Mondrian liked to use the primary colors over and over in his abstract paintings. The areas created by the lines were selectively colored by students, also using primary colors. One of Mondrian's most famous paintings is entitled Composition with Red, Yellow and Blue. After the artistic process was finished, the Fourth Graders had a lot of fun naming their new "pets"!

Mondrian Animals by 4th Graders: image

Mondrian Animals by 4th Graders: image

Mondrian Animals by 4th Graders: image

Mondrian Animals by 4th Graders: image

Mondrian Animals by 4th Graders: image

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02.24.17
Kindergarten, Monet, and Grandparents!



Kindergarten students have beautiful Monet Water Lily Masterpieces hanging in the entrance hall beside the cafeteria. This was a special display created for Grandparents Day! Students were first introduced to Impressionist Claude Monet and his colorful work. After a basic review of the color wheel and proper painting procedures, students experimented with new techniques of painting. Trying wet-on-wet paper with watercolor, they painted over their oil pastel "movement" lines, learning about the watercolor resist technique. The flowers were made from coffee filters upon which they had colored designs using washable markers. We had discussed warm and cool color families before beginning. When misted with water, the colors bled together to make interesting water lilies with a lot of color play and blending! There were lots of "oohs" and "aahs" heard during that class! After drying and crushing them into the flower shapes, the water lilies were glued on to construction paper lily pads that students had cut and glued to the background water. Kindergarten students had an exciting experience of layering materials and learning new painting techniques! I'm sure that they will never forget Mr. Monet and his water lilies! Beautiful work, Kindergarteners. I am so proud of all of you! ☺

Kindergarten, Monet, and Grandparents! image

Kindergarten, Monet, and Grandparents! image

Kindergarten, Monet, and Grandparents! image

Kindergarten, Monet, and Grandparents! image

Kindergarten, Monet, and Grandparents! image

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02.10.17
Is Third Grade Coming or Going?

Third Graders’ imagination exploded with their own original Picassos, rendered in oil pastels on black paper! Students created their version of art in the manner of Pablo Picasso. Picasso enjoyed showing two different moments in time in the same image. A person may be in profile while turning away, but in front view the next moment. Picasso was one of the primary founders of Cubism.

This is always one of the most popular and remembered art projects of current and past St. James students. They begin the assignment thinking that there is no way they can do this, but surprise themselves. They love it and do a wonderful job on this beautiful and unique work! Go Third Grade!

Is Third Grade Coming or Going? image

Is Third Grade Coming or Going? image

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01.27.17
Get the Point?

After learning about French artist Georges Seurat (1859-1891), students in 4th and 5th grade tried their hand at Pointillism, a style of art Seurat invented. Although realizing that filling an area with dots was no small accomplishment, they soon became aware there was more to it than that. While looking at our classroom color wheel chart, students learned
that when Seurat noticed if the impressionists wanted to make a color brighter, they would include a bit of the color’s opposite (complementary colors). He often placed marks made in primary colors (red, yellow, blue) side by side so they would create an optical mix (colors combine in the viewer’s eye to create the illusion of another color). To increase a hue’s intensity, Seurat worked with complementary color pairs (opposite each other on the color wheel) such as red and green which made the color appear brighter. He used dots of primary colors side by side to create the illusion of secondary colors. Seurat used related (next to each other on the color wheel) warm colors (yellow, orange, red) for sunlit areas and related cool colors (blue, green, purple) for shady zones in his paintings. One of Seurat’s most famous Pointillist works is Sunday on La Grande Jatte. In it, the artist has used more than 3.5 million dots, dashes, tiny circles, and hatch marks to create the feeling of a sparkling sunlit summer day.

It is a rare occasion that two different grades do the same project. Modifications are made. There was no turning down their request when I showed them a copy of an otter in black and white pointillism. After learning that the artist was a teacher in the middle school building (no, not me), they pleaded to do so.

One of the photos is of Fourth Grade’s pointillism projects, and the second one is of Fifth Grade’s pointillism project. A photograph of the mystery black and white pointillism piece is also below.

We all hope you certainly “get the point”!

Get the Point? image

Get the Point? image

Get the Point? image

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01.13.17
DAR ART STAMP CONTEST WINNERS!

St. James Day School Art Students,1st through 4th Grade, recently celebrated America’s national parks by participating in an Art Stamp contest. The theme was “Our National Parks: 100 Years of Service to America”.

The National Society of Daughters of the American Revolution created the Junior American Citizens (JAC) Committee to promote good citizenship and appreciation of American heritage and history among every school-age child in the United States. The JAC Committee offers contests in art, creative expressions, and community service. Contests are conducted without regard to gender, race, religion, or national origin. Our Art students had to design a postal stamp using the contest theme. The entry could be original artwork only. The design had to be exactly 5” x 7” and drawn in the center of an 8 ½” x 11” sheet of white paper.

Marji Fuerst, DAR representative, presented the following awards to our winning students. All four of our first place winners in each grade will have their winning entry forwarded on to the State of Texas finals, to compete with other cities for State Awards. We are super proud of all of you!
DAR Art Contest - Stamp Division

First Grade
Jack, 1st Place
Alli, 2nd Place
Sadie, 3rd Place

Second Grade
Adam, 1st Place
Anna Claire, 2nd Place
John, 3rd Place

Third Grade
Heath, 1st Place
Addison, 2nd Place
Kavya, 3rd Place

Fourth Grade
Elle, 1st Place
Molly, 2nd Place
Aimee, 3rd Place

DAR ART STAMP CONTEST WINNERS! image

DAR ART STAMP CONTEST WINNERS! image

DAR ART STAMP CONTEST WINNERS! image

DAR ART STAMP CONTEST WINNERS! image

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12.14.16
Christmas Blog 12-9-16

Christmas is a special time of year…. bright with blessings, warm with love. It is a time of peace on earth, as heart to heart we celebrate our gentle Savior’s birth. May the blessed spirit of His love be in your heart today and always. Have a joyous Christmas and a blessed new year!

The Art Room is awash with glitter! Your children have been working on several different pieces of art with bright smiles and eagerness.

Kindergarten has completed their traditional angels with glittery halos and wings of fluffy cotton. I still have much older students come back to visit and mention with a smile that they still have their angel on the Christmas tree each year!

First Graders have created 3-dimensional Christmas trees made with loops from paper chains, and of course GLITTER!

Second Grade discussed the use of advent wreaths and the meaning of the candles placed on them. Students then created pieces of art that portrayed paper Advent Wreaths, complete with paper candles.

Beautiful patterned birds were portrayed by Third Graders, using warm and cool colors . Cutting, coloring, and folding were used to make these lovely 3-D paper bird ornaments to adorn their trees at home.

Fourth Grade had a really “sweet” project! While drawing and coloring “Candy Houses”, they exercised their imaginations while using the elements of line, texture, and color……..and illustrations of lots of candy!

In conjunction with their Colonial Project, Fifth Graders learned about and drew colorful Barn Hex Signs, which were once used to ward off sickness, lightning, fire, and bad luck. Twig stars, quilled art, and original art was also made and displayed.

Sixth Graders talked about careers in the art field. As illustrators, their assignment was to create Christmas Cards or Christmas art in the style of published artists. Beautiful renderings, Sixth Grade!

Christmas Blog 12-9-16 image

Christmas Blog 12-9-16 image

Christmas Blog 12-9-16 image

Christmas Blog 12-9-16 image

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11.11.16
Veteran’s Day Blog 11-11-16

We all, young and old, love our Veterans! We all look forward each year to being able to honor and thank them for their military service, present or past, to our wonderful country. Each year St. James Day School invites veterans to a special program to recognize and express our love and gratitude. It is our privilege to say “thank you” to all of America’s veterans, to let them know that we appreciate them for their service and honor them for their sacrifices. Those words apply equally to our World War I, World War II, Vietnam War, and Gulf War veterans. They also apply to today’s active duty military — tomorrow’s veterans — who are helping to maintain peace throughout the world.

Students, kindergarten through sixth grade, chose art as one of their ways to honor all of our brave men and women. In this way they celebrate America’s veterans for keeping this great nation “the land of the free and the home of the brave.” They all participated in making a beautiful, huge, American Flag out of paper chains in honor of our country.

Veteran’s Day Blog 11-11-16 image

Veteran’s Day Blog 11-11-16 image

Veteran’s Day Blog 11-11-16 image

Veteran’s Day Blog 11-11-16 image

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10.21.16
Third Grade and Pictographs

Blog 10-21-16
Third Grade and Pictographs

After studying about our first artists, prehistoric man, and their art dating from 35,00 to 1500 B.C., our Third Grade artists focused on the cave art of Lascaux, France. Their prehistoric art project was creating a piece of ceramic stone out of clay that would be similar to a piece of cave wall. First they worked with the clay until they had formed a flat shape. After firing this in our kiln, the “stones” were painted with sponges and grey paint that they mixed from black and white tempera paint. This was to resemble texture. Students then drew on their “stones” a prehistoric animal and symbols of their choice in oil pastels. This type of art is called pictographs. The pictograph conveys its meaning through its pictorial resemblance to a physical object.

Third Grade’s unit of study in Social Studies has recently included our Native Americans. This is always an exciting favorite for students in Art, as well as Social Studies. Plains Indians, as well as many other tribes, would use buffalo skins to make buffalo robes. These robes were decorated with pictographs of important events recorded on them. It was an interesting discovery for students to see that the type of art from prehistoric time was repeated in the art of our Native Americans! Third Graders went about creating a “paper hide” of a buffalo. No scissors were allowed, so they had to tear the shape of an animal hide from a large piece of paper. This wasn’t as easy as they thought! Students drew their original pictograph firmly with crayon onto the ”hide”. This was then crumpled up tightly and otherwise “stressed”. This was definitely one of the young artists’ most fun parts! They immersed the paper into a brown tempera and water mixture and kneaded the “hide” gently (?) but thoroughly. The skins were then removed and flattened out to dry on newspapers. The effects of “crayon resist” were evident. In the photograph below of our mock “skinning rack”, the top animal skin is before the distressing of the paper. The rest are after!
Fantastic work, Third Grade!

Third Grade and Pictographs image

Third Grade and Pictographs image

Third Grade and Pictographs image

Third Grade and Pictographs image

Third Grade and Pictographs image

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10.07.16
10-7-16, Messenger in a Bottle

Fifth Graders combined art, social studies, writing, and technology in the creation of this work of art. Students first used their prior knowledge of collage, a French word used to describe a technique of art production, by gluing bits of paper, etc., to other surfaces. Each student selected their own color scheme, and tore bits of colored tissue, which were layered and glued to their surface. This time, however, they would be working on a three-dimensional surface…an empty wine bottle. In the early days of explorers, ships would sail for a very long time, presenting the problem of storing water. Wine and rum would have also been carried, both of which, mixed with water to make it drinkable, could reasonably disinfect the water. It smelled horrible and tasted worse, so most ships carried wine and beer as their first drink of choice.

The explorer of their choice was selected in Fifth Grade Social Studies class. Students designed the first and last name of their explorer, and researched facts on the computer. Fifth graders were responsible for compiling their technology research elements. Using a computer printed picture of their
explorers as a reference, students drew portraits in the Art Room. They learned how values could be created with drawing pencils and a stump. This made their explorers look real. All of the students did an outstanding job on this! The drawn portrait and the explorer’s computer printed name were then collaged to the bottle. Instead of tossing them into the sea, the projects were then ready to share!

A very impressive job, Fifth Grade! Beautiful work!

10-7-16, Messenger in a Bottle image

10-7-16, Messenger in a Bottle image

10-7-16, Messenger in a Bottle image

10-7-16, Messenger in a Bottle image

10-7-16, Messenger in a Bottle image

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09.23.16
Fourth Grade, Cathedrals, Gothic Architecture, and Rose Windows.

Blog 9-23-16

Fourth graders have learned about famous cathedrals using Gothic architecture. Emulating the radial balanced design of the Rose Window, students have made their own stained glass (paper) version. These will grace the windows in the cafeteria, less known as “The St. James Louvre.”

People in the Middle Ages often cared deeply about the cathedrals where they worshiped. The people thought of the cathedral as being an image of heaven itself, almost like a little heaven on earth. By putting the cathedral right in the middle of their town, they meant to show that God was the center of their lives. The people believed that their devotion to the cathedral was a sign of their faith in God. This devotion to God not only inspired Gothic art and architecture, but also is one reason why the Middle Ages is sometimes called the “Age of Faith.”

Rose windows adorn the cathedrals. They are made out of stained glass cut into little bits that could be put together, almost like a mosaic, to create pictures. The rose windows always have a circular shape. Many times, the artists of the Middle Ages showed Jesus standing in the center of a sun-shaped wheel. Fourth grade used design, shape, balance, and radial symmetry to create their beautiful paper versions of the rose windows.

Fourth Grade, Cathedrals, Gothic Architecture, and Rose Windows. image

Fourth Grade, Cathedrals, Gothic Architecture, and Rose Windows. image

Fourth Grade, Cathedrals, Gothic Architecture, and Rose Windows. image

Fourth Grade, Cathedrals, Gothic Architecture, and Rose Windows. image

Fourth Grade, Cathedrals, Gothic Architecture, and Rose Windows. image

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09.19.16
Start of a Colorful Year in Art!

Blog 9-9-16
It was wonderful to see students and families at Meet The Teacher. Besides our returning students, it is always a treat to see former students and our St. James families! Art students K-6th Grade are off to a running start, and have just completed their sunglasses for “Our Reflections of A Great Summer”. After reviewing the meanings of image, pattern, design, symmetrical, frame, reflection (both meanings), diptych, and reflected image, students created this first of the year art project. The “sunglasses” will soon be ready to hang around the windows at the front of the cafeteria as we do every year. What a great way to see the students’ art growing!
To begin an exciting year in art, classes studied about our first artists, prehistoric man! Art dating from 35,00 to 1500 B.C. was discussed, including that of the cave art in Lascaux, France. Students are beginning art projects of this exciting period of time!
Fourth Graders have studied Gothic architecture, cathedrals, and Rose Windows. Using radial symmetry, they are working on their “rose windows”, which is no easy feat even if they are made only of paper!
Sixth Graders have finished wonderful line and pattern designs. After review of the different types of lines, students discussed how each type conveys a different message. Line quality was defined as the thickness or thinness and the darkness and lightness of a line. Students created a line design by using as many of the five different lines as possible. The sections were then filled with original patterns. The black and white design was then copied and filled with gorgeous colors, creating patterns. Students mounted both pieces together in their own way. The black and white original mirrored the colored piece. Our awesome Sixth Graders succeeded in showing how creativity and color can affect a viewer’s mood and change the look of an artwork!

Start of a Colorful Year in Art! image

Start of a Colorful Year in Art! image

Start of a Colorful Year in Art! image

Start of a Colorful Year in Art! image

Start of a Colorful Year in Art! image

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05.27.16
Fifth Grade Wins Marbles In ART

WOW! It's official! The students in Fifth Grade this year have won the marbles contest in ART for the third year in a row! But you won't see students down in the floor shooting or playing with marbles. It is a special bunch of marbles that are hopefully added to each class's designated jar at the end of each class. Every class that comes to ART is in the contest to see who can earn the most marbles in the school year. Kindergarten through Sixth Grade strives to be on their best behavior in Art to be awarded a marble. That means no excessive loud talking or otherwise non-acceptable behavior. That also means the entire class, so requires cooperation. The class with the most marbles at the end of the year gets to have their choice of a pizza party or an ice cream sundae party. Our winner this year is the Fifth Grade, with 28 marbles. This group of students have won the contest in third, fourth, and fifth grade! They have chosen the ice cream sundae party which will be Wednesday afternoon in their last art class of the year.

Members of this excellent class are: Emma, Melayna, Samuel, Thomas, Bella, Haley, Lydia, Macy, Jacob, William, Dominic, and Peyton (P.J.).

Along with their good behavior, members of this class are also awesome artists. Below are their ceramic Flower Bowls that they just completed designing, sculpting, and glazing. Beautiful work, Fifth Graders. YOU ARE ALL SUPER STUDENTS!

Fifth Grade Wins Marbles In ART image

Fifth Grade Wins Marbles In ART image

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05.13.16
Fourth Grade Self Portraits

Fourth Graders should all win an award for patience and diligence! They embarked on the journey of learning how to do a self portrait. They first learned that your face has definite proportions and ratios. The eyes are approximately half way down the face. We had to do investigations to see if it was true! They were amazed. There is approximately one eye width in between each of your eyes. Your face is about five eyes wide.

The bottom of the nose comes to halfway between the eyes and the chin. It begins narrowly at the eyebrows and flares at the tip. And, oh yes, be careful to not draw holes in the nose. If you do, it will look like a pig! Use indentations. The dreaded ears,(just kidding), are even with the corners of the eyes and the bottom of the nose. The mouth line is halfway down from the bottom of the nose to the chin.The corners of the mouth are narrow, with the lips becoming fuller in the center. But be careful. The most common problem is fat lips! The corners of the mouth are usually as wide as to the pupils. There is a gradual slope from the corners of the mouth to the center. And of course then there is the hair. Draw the hair the way it is combed. Even short hair comes over the curve at the top of the head and alongside the ears. There is no gap between the hair and neck. The hair on the back of the head fills in that space. To determine how long hair is over the forehead, check its proximity to the eyebrows.

When you look at their portraits you will realize just how hard they worked. I am so proud of them all. You are awesome, Fourth Grade!

Fourth Grade Self Portraits image

Fourth Grade Self Portraits image

Fourth Grade Self Portraits image

Fourth Grade Self Portraits image

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04.25.16
First Graders “Meet” Illustrator Leo Lionni, Part 2

As promised, I am posting the photos of Mrs. Looney's first graders with their art piece created in the style of illustrator Leo Lionni. After reading his book FREDERICK, they created their illustration using painted paper for the rocks. The mice were created with paper that was cut into shapes and glued together. Students then composed their illustration using the technique of collage. I'm sure Leo Lionni would be as proud of them as I am!

GREAT JOB FIRST GRADERS!

First Graders “Meet” Illustrator Leo Lionni, Part 2 image

First Graders “Meet” Illustrator Leo Lionni, Part 2 image

First Graders “Meet” Illustrator Leo Lionni, Part 2 image

First Graders “Meet” Illustrator Leo Lionni, Part 2 image

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04.08.16
First Graders “Meet” Illustrator Leo Lionni

First Grade classes talked about a few of the many art careers that are possible. We recently discussed illustrators and their work. From Library Class, students were very aware of what the illustrator does. Leo Lionni is an author and illustrator of many children’s picture books. He wrote and illustrated more than forty highly acclaimed children’s books. Lionni received the 1984 American Institute of Graphic Arts Gold Medal and was a four-time Caldecott Honor Winner for outstanding illustrations in a book. These were for: Inch by Inch, Frederick, Swimmy, and Alexander and the Wind-Up Mouse.

We read the book FREDERICK by Leo Lionni in art class and discussed different styles of different artists. Students then created their own "Frederick" illustration using Lionni's technique of painting paper to look like rock, cutting it into shapes of the mice, and collaging them together to create the pictures. Our young artists all created charming FREDERICK illustrations of their own!



GREAT JOB, MS. PRICE'S FIRST GRADERS!





Pictures continued on next page blog.

First Graders “Meet” Illustrator Leo Lionni image

First Graders “Meet” Illustrator Leo Lionni image

First Graders “Meet” Illustrator Leo Lionni image

First Graders “Meet” Illustrator Leo Lionni image

First Graders “Meet” Illustrator Leo Lionni image

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03.22.16
St.James Art Students Win at State!


The DAR Junior American Citizen Art Contest has announced its winners for the State of Texas!
Our second and third grade entries from the Lone Star Chapter of DAR were by Kennley O'Rourke and Morgan Yost.

It is with great pleasure to announce Kennley's entry won First Place in the State of Texas "Celebrate America" Art Contest.

And, with equal pleasure we are happy to announce that Morgan Yost won Third Place in the State of Texas "Celebrate America" Art Contest.

Congratulations to Kennley and Morgan for this wonderful achievement!

A special event to honor Kennley and Morgan at the DAR awards meeting will be on May 1st. They will be recognized and presented with a certificate at this awards event. Kennley's first place winner will go on to compete further at the national level.


I am extremely proud of both of our young artists. They both always give 100% when they create their art.

St.James Art Students Win at State! image

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03.01.16
3R Grade Owl Prints

On display in the cafeteria "Louvre", are some major art pieces created by 3rd Graders. The display entitled, "Owls At Night", are a culmination of a several week art project. Students first studied and practiced drawing owls for their project. Their drawings had the limitations of being able to create a printing plate with their owl incised into it. Every single student experienced the excitement of inking their plate with their choice of three different colors of printing ink. They rolled their ink choice onto the plate with a roller, placed a piece of black paper on top of the ink, put smooth pressure on the back of the paper, and then carefully "pulled" their first print. Even if their first try wasn't the greatest, I was so proud of all of them for exhibiting the understanding that not getting a 100% exact print was part of the printing process and was normal. Students printed two more times to have three original owl prints.The Art Room was awash with bright smiles and excitement when they saw how great their prints turned out!

The next part of their project was creating a background for their owls. Students used oil pastels on black paper to create a close up tree at night. Every student added their own touches to give their owls an inviting home at night. Third graders then cut out their owls and collaged them to their background. Great accomplishment, third graders!

Below will be photographs of some of both Mrs. Propps' students' and Mrs. Romano's students' art pieces. More pictures will be displayed as I have room for them. Please excuse the photos' orientations!

3R Grade Owl Prints image

3R Grade Owl Prints image

3R Grade Owl Prints image

3R Grade Owl Prints image

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02.12.16
Celebrate America Art Contest

The American History Chairperson of The Lone Star Chapter of DAR recently invited our students in the 1st, 2nd and 3rd grades to participate in an art contest themed, “Celebrate America!”

I am so proud of all of our lower school art students for their talent and enthusiasm for this contest. My art room was abuzz with excitement! Students were greatly inspired with “God, Home, and Country”.

Congratulations to the following campus winners who were recognized with certificates and prizes for each grade level:

First Grade Winners:

1st place - Bralynn; 2nd place – Rosie; 3rd place – Adam

Second Grade Winners:

1st place - Morgan; 2nd place - Sanders; 3rd place - Ayers

Third Grade Winners:

1st place - Kennley; 2nd place - Elle; 3rd place - Hannah



The first place winner of all the entries in the area will be sent on to compete in the State of Texas DAR “Celebrate America” Art Contest. If we have a winner on the state level, that winner will be entered to represent the State of Texas on the national level of DAR for this art contest!

I loved the words expressed to teachers by the DAR American History Chairperson, Marji Fuerst: “What you are doing is certainly making a difference in our children’s lives and their appreciation of this great country. What they are learning today will influence the kind of American citizens they will become in the future.”

"Pictures to Follow".....

Celebrate America Art Contest image

Celebrate America Art Contest image

Celebrate America Art Contest image

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01.25.16
6th Grade India!

With school starting up after the holidays, we have all hit the floor running! The sixth grade has finished gorgeous Mandalas for their unit on India.The word "mandala" is from the classical Indian language of Sanskrit. Loosely translated to mean "circle", a mandala is far more than a simple shape. It represents wholeness, and be seen as a model for the organization structure of life itself ---a diagram that reminds us of our relation to the infinite, the world that extends both beyond and within our bodies and minds. The mandala appears in all aspects in life: the celestial circles we call earth, sun, and moon, as well as the circles of friends, family, and community. You may see these gorgeous creations of our talented sixth graders on display in the cafeteria art gallery!

6th Grade India! image

6th Grade India! image

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12.15.15
Colonial Art, 5th grade, Dec. continued

While learning about various aspects of daily colonial life in their Thirteen Colonies Unit, 5th graders explored the art of the time. In Art Class we discussed how cultures are primarily defined and expressed through the arts. One of the popular folk arts of the Pennsylvania Germans was creating barn hex symbols. These good luck symbols were painted on the front and back ends of barns as well as over the front door of a newly married couple. Hex symbols first appeared in America in the 1800’s. These were circular with a star design in the middle and surrounded with geometric shapes.

The students had great fun learning how to make cornhusk dolls. Even the students that were reluctant to make them were surprised at how much fun they had! It is believed that Indians taught pilgrim children how to use cornhusks to make these simple dolls. We also learned why most of the dolls did not have a face on them. This story goes back to a Northeastern Native American legend that reminded people that we must not be vain, and we all have duties and responsibilities to carry out.

Our next project was to learn the art of quilling. This is the technique of creating designs with narrow strips of paper that have been rolled, shaped, arranged, and then affixed onto a background. Historically, the narrow paper strips were tightly wrapped around the quill of a feather to produce the curled shapes. Students created excellent examples of this art!

After we discussed silhouette art of the time, Ms. Denise used a modern approach to make silhouettes for all the students to keep! Thank you, Ms. Denise! What a wonderful period of time.


Colonial Art, 5th grade, Dec. continued image

Colonial Art, 5th grade, Dec. continued image

Colonial Art, 5th grade, Dec. continued image

Colonial Art, 5th grade, Dec. continued image

Colonial Art, 5th grade, Dec. continued image

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12.15.15
5th Grade Nov/Dec

Fifth Graders have been busy, busy, busy in the Art Room in November and December. The last part of November, students combined art, social studies, writing, and technology in the creation of “Explorers/Message in a Bottle”. Using prior knowledge of collage on a three-dimensional surface, students created beautiful bottles to showcase the “explorer” part of their project. Using a picture of their chosen explorer as a reference, the young artists drew portraits demonstrating proper feature placement, and creating values with drawing pencils. Students designed the first and last name of their explorer, chose one of his voyages to illustrate, and researched facts on the computer. The portrait and explorer names were collaged to the bottle. Instead of tossing them into the sea, the projects were then ready to share as unique works of art!

5th Grade Nov/Dec image

5th Grade Nov/Dec image

5th Grade Nov/Dec image

5th Grade Nov/Dec image

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12.07.15
November, 6th Grade Egyptian Art!

Sixth graders had an awesome Egyptian Fair! Since cultures are primarily defined and expressed through the arts, this period of time is full of several exciting art projects always looked forward to by art students. November was filled with these projects. After a review of the placement of features in portraiture, sixth graders drew and painted King Tut’s portrait using a photograph of his funerary mask. Students also looked up their names on a virtual hieroglyphic translator, and drew the symbols around their painting with colored pencils. Numerous Egyptian scenes were artistically rendered and were used for wall decorations and on miniature pyramids displayed. Outstanding work, sixth graders! I am always blown away by your talent!







November, 6th Grade Egyptian Art! image

November, 6th Grade Egyptian Art! image

November, 6th Grade Egyptian Art! image

November, 6th Grade Egyptian Art! image

November, 6th Grade Egyptian Art! image

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10.13.15
4th Grade Rose Windows

Fourth graders studied about famous cathedrals in the Middle Ages and Gothic architecture. The architect emphasized vertical lines in his design. The cathedral was built to be tall, but the architect has made it seem to stretch even higher by giving the cathedral a long rectangular shape, by emphasizing vertical lines, and by using decorations that reach toward the clouds. In the Middle Ages, heaven was often shown as being in the sky, high above the clouds. The design of the building is meant to remind people of God by pointing toward heaven. This devotion to God not only inspired Gothic art, but also is one reason why the Middle Ages is sometimes called the “Age of Faith.” Originally, stained glass windows were used as instructional aids in churches and chapels. Scenes from the Bible or from the lives of the saints were illustrated for all to see in this way.

A special kind of window, called a rose window, is often found in Gothic cathedrals. Rose windows are circular shaped and made out of bits of brightly colored glass, called stained glass. Emulating the radially balanced design of the Rose Window, our fourth grade artists have made their own stained glass (paper) version. Students used shapes cut in radial symmetry and covered with colored tissue. A lot of planning, patience, and artistic care can be seen in these lovely pieces of art. These will soon grace the windows in the cafeteria. Beautiful work, 4th Grade!



Pictures soon to come!

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09.11.15
September 11, 2015 ST. JAMES ARTISTS ROCK!

It is so great to be back to school with all of the excited faces in the Art Room! All of our students in Grades K – 6th Grade have been busy creating their beginning of school art project entitled , “Reflections of Summer”. We discussed the meanings of image, pattern, design, symmetrical, frame, reflection, and reflected image. We talked about different meanings of the word reflection. Students had their hands up to answer, “an image that is reflected, like a moon in a lake”, or “what you see in a mirror”. We also discussed another meaning of reflection being “serious thought as you look back on something “.

Students’ assignment was to create a pair of paper sunglasses or glasses. This was to have in both lenses a picture of something they did, or wish they had done, in the summer. This is where the word diptych was thrown out there. It was explained that it was like a mini story in two frames. They could start their picture in one of the lenses and continue it in the second lens, creating a diptych. The frame around the lenses was to be colored in any color as long as there was some type of pattern on it. Students were quick to note that the frame on glasses and the frame on a painting both went around something.

Everyone had fun doing this. Their imagination is always great to watch come to light! The glasses are put around the windows at the front of the cafeteria each year. Even the students themselves love to see how different they are each year. It is a great way to see a sample of how their art is growing! Look for the sign that says, "OUR REFLECTIONS OF A GREAT SUMMER".


In first picture is Ms. Price's 1st Grade Class modeling their sunglasses!

September 11, 2015 ST. JAMES ARTISTS ROCK! image

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05.06.15
March On Young Artists!

Amid ice, special projects, Easter holidays, and Gala projects, our young artists have learned to adapt to starting, stopping, and restarting their art! Grades Kindergarten through 6th grade worked diligently on sixth grade’s fundraiser “Art to Remember”. Each student completed a piece of art that was mailed to the company for reproduction on various objects (cups, magnets, etc.). Parents have been given the opportunity to purchase the item of their choice with their young artist’s original work on it!

Kindergarten learned about artist Piet Mondrian, and illustrated how he used line, color, and shape to produce an abstract piece of art. They learned that abstract art is much like a milkshake. You know about milk, and you know about ice cream, but if you put them together you get a completely different thing. You might like it, or you might not!

In First Grade we talked about art of different cultures. One example was body decoration or art as seen in Africa and India. Students traced their hands and adorned them with designs or jewelry drawn with markers.

Second Grade began one of the St. James student favorites, “Spirals and Snails”.
They used line, design, shape, color, pattern, and center of interest. Students also learned more about patience!

Third Graders read about Surrealist artist Joan Miro who was heavy into design. His dreamlike paintings are filled with strange symbolic shapes, forms, and creatures. Students created their own vocabulary of visual elements and combined them in various ways to create as many figures as possible. An original dreamscape scene in the style of Miro was filled with their “Martians”. They worked with line, design, repetition, color, and balance. And of course a large dose of creativity! Markers and pastels were used for their artwork.

To be continued........

March On Young Artists! image

March On Young Artists! image

March On Young Artists! image

March On Young Artists! image

March On Young Artists! image

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02.19.15
ART! Aztecs to Picassos!

What a wonderful St. James Open House and Grandparents Day we had on February 13! Your fabulous young artists, Kindergarten to Sixth Grade, worked tirelessly completing art to display for this special yearly event. If you missed seeing the art hung in the St. James Louvre (the cafeteria), you still have the opportunity to see it. You will find that your children are truly impressive with what they accomplish at their age! I am so proud of them, and I know that all of you are, too.

KINDERGARTEN students have beautiful Monet Water Lily masterpieces hanging in the gym. This was a special display this year for the Grandparents Day program. Students were introduced to Impressionist Claude Monet and his colorful work. After a basic review of the color wheel and proper painting procedures, students experimented with new techniques of painting. Trying wet-on-wet paper with watercolor and painting over their oil pastel lines, they learned about the resist technique. The flowers were made from coffee filters that they had colored designs on with washable markers. When wet down, the colors bled together to make interesting water lilies. After drying and crushing them into the flower shapes, they glued them onto lily pads and added them to their painting. Students had an exciting experience of layering materials and learning new painting techniques!

FIRST GRADERS fell in love with Vincent van Gogh’s Starry Night, and tried their hand at showing movement with repeated lines and swirling concentric rings or circles. They learned that Van Gogh tried to express his thoughts and emotions in his paintings, often working days without stopping, spending all of his money on paints, and even forgetting to eat. See their Starry Nights in the First Grade classroom!

Don’t forget to look on the cafeteria walls for First Grade’s abstract flowers, drawn as if Vincent van Gogh’s style collided with Georgia O’Keeffe’s close up flowers! These are rendered in warm and cool color schemes. First Graders looked at the art of Georgia O'Keeffe and discussed her giant flowers. Using the knowledge they had gained with Vincent Van Gogh’s Starry Night, students then drew abstract flowers inspired by O'Keeffe's style and the repeated line work of Van Gogh.


SECOND GRADE studied more in depth about American artist Georgia O’Keeffe. Known especially for her giant flowers, O’Keeffe felt city dwellers never took time to enjoy flowers so she made them so big that they could not be overlooked! After discussing viewpoint, space, and texture, students learned that artists sometimes enlarge objects to show a special point of view. The second graders studied pictures of real flowers and selected one to draw realistically, up close, and touching at least three sides of the paper. Their flowers were drawn from the viewpoint of a bee! They then used crayons to color them with a very waxy texture. Watercolor was used to paint over the flowers using the crayon resist technique. Wow!

THIRD GRADE students used oil pastels to create their versions of art in the manner of Pablo Picasso. Picasso enjoyed showing two different moments in time. A person may be in profile one moment, but in front view the next. Third Grader’s imagination exploded with their Picassos, rendered in oil pastel on black paper! This is always one of the most popular and remembered art projects of current and past St. James students. They love it and do a wonderful job!

FOURTH GRADE discussed how cultures are primarily defined and expressed through the arts. In the cafeteria students show a Japanese hanging paper weave with gold leaf prints. These are displayed next to their Gyotaku fish prints. Gyotaku (pronounced G-O-taku) is the Japanese word for “fish print”. Gyotaku was a method for Japanese fishermen to record the size and species of their catches. It was impossible to tell a fish story without a Gyotaku to back up the tale. Because the prints were so beautiful it became an art form. Traditional gyotaku is created with real fish. Fourth graders took the smell and the mess out of this process by using rubber molds of actual fish to dive into their aquatic adventure! Each fish print has also been stamped with an original carved and printed “chop” illustrating a Japanese word.

FIFTH GRADE expressed themselves with abstract pieces, using five different kinds of lines and various patterns. A black and white design is mounted next to a color copy of it to show how color can alter the mood.

Exercises in visual memory and imaginative seeing are encouraged. The Fifth Grade’s Modern Mona Lisa creations are unique examples of this. We discussed right vs. left-brain with regards to art: creativity is a right-brain process, while logic and sequencing are a left-brain process. The students drew upside-down to engage the left-brain in art. Be sure and read the explanation posted beside the art in our St. James Louvre, as to how they were actually drawn upside down by students! They were allowed to finish with imaginative touches in the style of Marcel Duchamp.

SIXTH GRADE
In conjunction with their study of Ancient Civilizations, Sixth Graders created their masks of Aztec Gods by using a repousse` technique. Pieces of cut cardboard were glued to a thick cardboard base to form the underlying structure of the faces. This was covered with aluminum foil and then brushed with black tempera paint. When dry, the piece was burnished with steel wool to bring out the details of the built up image underneath. This results in a wonderfully antique look! Great work, Sixth Grade! They are currently working on the creation of Sgraffito Greek Vases.






ART! Aztecs to Picassos! image

ART! Aztecs to Picassos! image

ART! Aztecs to Picassos! image

ART! Aztecs to Picassos! image

ART! Aztecs to Picassos! image

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11.01.14
October/November Art News

Kindergarten has learned how to draw spiders with webs, bats, jack-o-lanterns, black cats, and scarecrows. They have also experienced using white crayon and construction paper crayons to draw a picture on black paper. They loved it! Their next project will be creating a gorgeous turkey for Thanksgiving time.

First Grade has studied about the color wheel! They also completed their tree project! It can be seen in the "St. James Louvre", better known as the school cafeteria. They learned to draw and paint a tree without leaves, and then painted fall leaves onto it. They totally enjoyed the way the paint colors mixed with the dabbing motion. Students also have created an origami owl, and drawn various Halloween scenes.

Second Graders created beautiful watercolor wash sunsets upon which silhouettes of houses, spooky trees, and other imagined things they had drawn were glued.

Second and Third Grade used overlapped abstraction in the style of Spanish artist Joan Miro to produce Fall themed abstract art. This took observation, thinking, and lots of patience! Ask them to explain to you how it was done!

Third Graders have been making paper animal skins! Since there were no scissors used by the Native Americans to skin animals, students had to tear the shape out of brown paper. They drew a pictograph story on the skins, recording events that occurred during the year. The skins will be seen at the 3rd Grade Native American Presentations on November 13.

Our Fourth Graders have drawn wonderful “Skeletons in Action” to complement their study of bones in Science class. Soon you will also find their “Mondrian Spider Webs” in the St. James Louvre. They have creatively drawn spider webs, complete with their resident spiders, and filled them with colors in the style of Dutch artist Piet Mondrian. Mondrian liked to use the primary colors over and over in his abstract paintings. One of his famous paintings is entitled "Composition with Red,Yellow and Blue".

Fifth Grade students created a line design by using as many of the five different lines as possible. The sections were filled with patterns. The black and white design was then copied and filled with colors. Students learned how lines, pattern, and color can affect a viewer’s mood and change the look of an artwork. Students have also begun their “Explorer in a Bottle” project with great zeal! The results will be soon to come!

Sixth Graders have been super busy getting their Egyptian art ready for “Egypt Day”! They have completed drawing and painting King Tut’s portrait. Students also looked up their names on a virtual hieroglyphic translator, and drew the symbols around their painting with colored pencils. Numerous Egyptian scenes have been artistically rendered and will be used for wall decorations.

Pictures to follow.....

October/November Art News image

October/November Art News image

October/November Art News image

October/November Art News image

October/November Art News image

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09.24.14
The Lines of Shape and Design

Since the start of this school year, busy, busy, busy, would best describe the St. James art students! Every student has participated in a project entitled “Our Reflections Of A Great Summer”. We discussed two different meanings of the word “reflection”, and art vocabulary words frame, design, pattern, symmetrical, horizon, and diptych. The students were given blank paper sunglasses upon which they decorated the frames with color and designs. The inside of the glasses were to reflect what they saw, did, or wish they could have done this summer. These can be seen in the Cafeteria Art Gallery.

Kindergarteners now know that they can draw anything if they use the five basic elements of shape: the dot and circle family, the straight-line family, the curved- line family, and the angle family

First grade & Second graders learned more about pattern, design, and symmetry. These things were combined with line design and paper cutting to produce lovely window art.

Third grade reviewed and practiced the use of symmetry in art. In conjunction with the story Gloria Who Might Be My Best Friend, they used paper cutting and designing skills to produce wonderful stained glass (actually paper) kites. Soon,
They also made warm/cool collages with an acetate overlay drawing to illustrate the effect different color schemes can have on the same drawing.

Fourth graders learned about famous cathedrals using Gothic architecture. Emulating the radial balanced design of the Rose Window, students have made their own stained glass (paper) version. These will grace the windows in the cafeteria all year. Students also learned about mosaic and Byzantine Art.

Fifth graders: Aztec,Mayan designs uniquely drawn using bleach and Q Tips

Sixth graders have glazed the clay flower bowls that they sculpted. After firing in the kiln, we will have beautiful and original ceramic bowls to show!

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09.16.09
Start of a Colorful Year in Art!

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09.16.09
Start of a Colorful Year in Art!

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09.16.09
Start of a Colorful Year in Art!

It was wonderful to see students and families at Meet The Teacher. Besides our returning students, it is always a treat to see former students and our St. James families! Art students K-6th Grade are off to a running start, and have just completed their sunglasses for “Our Reflections of A Great Summer”. After reviewing the meanings of image, pattern, design, symmetrical, frame, reflection (both meanings), diptych, and reflected image, students created this first of the year art project. The “sunglasses” will soon be ready to hang around the windows at the front of the cafeteria as we do every year. What a great way to see the students’ art growing!
To begin an exciting year in art, classes studied about our first artists, prehistoric man! Art dating from 35,00 to 1500 B.C. was discussed, including that of the cave art in Lascaux, France. Students are beginning art projects of this exciting period of time!
Fourth Graders have studied Gothic architecture, cathedrals, and Rose Windows. Using radial symmetry, they are working on their “rose windows”, which is no easy feat even if they are made only of paper!
Sixth Graders have finished wonderful line and pattern designs. After review of the different types of lines, students discussed how each type conveys a different message. Line quality was defined as the thickness or thinness and the darkness and lightness of a line. Students created a line design by using as many of the five different lines as possible. The sections were then filled with original patterns. The black and white design was then copied and filled with gorgeous colors, creating patterns. Students mounted both pieces together in their own way. The black and white original mirrored the colored piece. Our awesome Sixth Graders succeeded in showing how creativity and color can affect a viewer’s mood and change the look of an artwork!

Start of a Colorful Year in Art! image

Start of a Colorful Year in Art! image

Start of a Colorful Year in Art! image

Start of a Colorful Year in Art! image

Start of a Colorful Year in Art! image

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09.16.09
A Colorful and Exciting Year of Art at St. James Day School!

It was wonderful to see students and families at Meet The Teacher. Besides our returning students, it is always a treat to see former students and our St. James families! Art students K-6th Grade are off to a running start, and have just completed their sunglasses for “Our Reflections of A Great Summer”. After reviewing the meanings of image, pattern, design, symmetrical, frame, reflection (both meanings), diptych, and reflected image, students created this first of the year art project. The “sunglasses” will soon be ready to hang around the windows at the front of the cafeteria as we do every year. What a great way to see the students’ art growing!

To begin an exciting year in art, classes studied about our first artists, prehistoric man! Art dating from 35,00 to 1500 B.C. was discussed, including that of the cave art in Lascaux, France. Students are beginning art projects of this exciting period of time!

Fourth Graders have studied Gothic architecture, cathedrals, and Rose Windows. Using radial symmetry, they are working on their “rose windows”, which is no easy feat, even if they are made only of paper!

Sixth Graders have finished wonderful line and pattern designs. After review of the different types of lines, students discussed how each type conveys a different message. Line quality was defined as the thickness or thinness and the darkness and lightness of a line. Students created a line design by using as many of the five different lines as possible. The sections were then filled with original patterns. The black and white design was then copied and filled with gorgeous colors, creating patterns. Students mounted both pieces together in their own way. The black and white original mirrored the colored piece. Our awesome Sixth Graders succeeded in showing how creativity and color can affect a viewer’s mood and change the look of an artwork!

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09.16.09
A New Year of and Colorful and Exciting Art at St. James Day School

It was wonderful to see students and families at Meet The Teacher. Besides our returning students, it is always a treat to see former students and our St. James families! Art students K-6th Grade are off to a running start, and have just completed their sunglasses for “Our Reflections of A Great Summer”. After reviewing the meanings of image, pattern, design, symmetrical, frame, reflection (both meanings), diptych, and reflected image, students created this first of the year art project. The “sunglasses” will soon be ready to hang around the windows at the front of the cafeteria as we do every year. What a great way to see the students’ art growing!

To begin an exciting year in art, classes studied about our first artists, prehistoric man! Art dating from 35,00 to 1500 B.C. was discussed, including that of the cave art in Lascaux, France. Students are beginning art projects of this exciting period of time!

Fourth Graders have studied Gothic architecture, cathedrals, and Rose Windows. Using radial symmetry, they are working on their “rose windows”, which is no easy feat, even if they are made only of paper!

Sixth Graders have finished wonderful line and pattern designs entitled "Lots of Lines". After review of the different types of lines, students discussed how each type conveys a different message. Line quality was defined as the thickness or thinness and the darkness and lightness of a line. Students created a line design by using as many of the five different lines as possible. The sections were then filled with original patterns. The black and white design was then copied and filled with gorgeous colors, creating patterns. Students mounted both pieces together in their own chosen way. The black and white original mirrored the colored piece. Our awesome Sixth Graders succeeded in showing how creativity and color can affect a viewer’s mood and change the look of an artwork!
Pictures to come.

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09.16.09
9-9-16 and Another Exciting Year of Art at St. James Day School!

It was wonderful to see students and families at Meet The Teacher. Besides our returning students, it is always a treat to see former students and our St. James families! Art students K-6th Grade are off to a running start, and have just completed their sunglasses for “Our Reflections of A Great Summer”. After reviewing the meanings of image, pattern, design, symmetrical, frame, reflection (both meanings), diptych, and reflected image, students created this first of the year art project. The “sunglasses” will soon be ready to hang around the windows at the front of the cafeteria as we do every year. What a great way to see the students’ art growing!

To begin an exciting year in art, classes studied about our first artists, prehistoric man! Art dating from 35,00 to 1500 B.C. was discussed, including that of the cave art in Lascaux, France. Students are beginning art projects of this exciting period of time!

Fourth Graders have studied Gothic architecture, cathedrals, and Rose Windows. Using radial symmetry, they are working on their “rose windows”, which is no easy feat even if they are made only of paper!

Sixth Graders have finished wonderful line and pattern designs. After review of the different types of lines, students discussed how each type conveys a different message. Line quality was defined as the thickness or thinness and the darkness and lightness of a line. Students created a line design by using as many of the five different lines as possible. The sections were then filled with original patterns. The black and white design was then copied and filled with gorgeous colors, creating patterns. Students mounted both pieces together in their own way. The black and white original mirrored the colored piece. Our awesome Sixth Graders succeeded in showing how creativity and color can affect a viewer’s mood and change the look of an artwork! Pictures below show their beautiful work!

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09.16.09
Another Year of Exciting and Colorful Art at St. James Day School

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09.16.09
A New Year of Exciting and Colorful Art at St. James Day School

It was wonderful to see students and families at Meet The Teacher. Besides our returning students, it is always a treat to also see former students, and our St. James Families!

Art students K-6th Grade are off to a running start, and have just completed their sunglasses for “Our Reflections of A Great Summer”. They will soon be ready to hang around the windows at the front of the cafeteria as we do every year. What a great way to start the year and see the students’ art growing!

To begin an exciting year in art, classes are studying about our first artists, prehistoric man! Art dating from 35,00 to 1500 B.C. was discussed, focusing on the Lascaux Cave Art. Students are beginning art projects of this exciting period of time!

Fourth Graders have studied about famous cathedrals using Gothic architecture and Rose Windows. Emulating the radial balanced design of the Rose Window, students are making their own stained glass (paper) version. This is no easy feat, even if they are made only of paper! These will soon grace the windows in the cafeteria (The St. James Louvre).

Sixth Graders have finished wonderful line, design, and pattern designs. Their very creative pieces are filled with black and white designs that are mirrored with the same design piece filled with gorgeous color. Our fantastic sixth graders have certainly illustrated how color can affect a viewer’s mood and change the look of an artwork. Their art pieces are filled with lines, shapes, designs, patterns, colors, and especially creativity. An awesome job by our totally awesome Sixth Graders!

Pictures to follow:

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